Jay Leno insider dishes on celebs' backstage demands in new book

(L-R) Christian Bale and Jessica Simpson. (WENN.COM file photo)

(L-R) Christian Bale and Jessica Simpson. (WENN.COM file photo)

Liz Braun, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 1:33 PM ET

Who got drunk on late-night TV, who was a knob and who got caught shagging in the dressing room?

Find out all the backstage dish in Behind the Curtain: An Insider’s View of Jay Leno’s Tonight Show, a new book by Dave Berg. Berg, who was a producer on the show for many years, is happy to spill.

The book is just out in the U.S. and will be available here soon.

According to the book, Eddie Murphy and Jessica Simpson were the king and queen of diva demands when it came to appearing on the show. Simpson asked that her hair and makeup be paid for by the show — not such a wild request, you'd think — then noted that the cost would be $18,000. That was filed under "No thanks".

Murphy, meanwhile, had a complicated dressing-room rider when he appeared on the show. Although he'd be in that dressing room under an hour, Murphy needed enough candy bars and drinks to stock a 7-Eleven: Snickers and Milky Ways, gum, mints, Coke in glass bottles, cream soda, root beer, 12 Snapples in various fruit flavours, sparkling water and Peppermint Patties, not to mention towels, washcloths, writing pads and something to write with.

In the loose cannon department, the book says Desperate Housewives star Teri Hatcher careered wildly between charming and moody to the point where Berg referred to her secretly as Teri One and Teri Two.

Paula Abdul's erratic behaviour was likewise noteworthy, although her reputation for flakey appearances on the show also made her a ratings hit.

Christian Bale once stormed out of a pre-interview for the show because he felt the questions were too personal.

(Sample question: Where did you grow up?)

Leno kept beer and wine backstage in case guests wanted a drink to calm their nerves before appearing. The NY Post says Quentin Tarantino was apparently among those who were over-refreshed and slurring by the time he was on-air.

Berg mostly leaves nameless those whose crimes against humanity ran to bad toilet habits, dressing-room quickies and other bodily function missteps. No doubt lawyers advised the author to leave out other names, too.

Still, is it just us or do the names named in reviews of the book thus far all fall under the celebrity categories of Don't Count and Don't Care?

A lot of these stories are a decade old, and the stars involved are either no longer in the ascendancy or so famous that they don't give a stuff what anyone says about them.

We're only asking because of the Golden Rule in Celebrityville: Only kick people when they're down. The ones who are still viable are off-limits because you never know when you might need them again.

Meanwhile, in further celebrity tell-alls and just in time for the release of the movie Jersey Boys, one April Kirkwood will release a scathing memoir of her lengthy affair with Frankie Valli.

Big Girls Do Cry (or The Endless Season — there seems to be some confusion about the title), due in August, traces Kirkwood's on-and-off relationship with the Four Seasons' lead singer, a relationship the author claims began when she was a 16 year old virgin and Valli was 39. Wait — it gets creepier.

Kirkwood was a super-fan who had been devoted to the singer and attending his concerts, dressed to be noticed, since she was a child of seven. Once they started sleeping together, she imagined he'd eventually marry her.

Stock this book in the fantasy section.

In a lengthy recent interview with the Daily Mail, Kirkwood trashes Valli quite thoroughly, and says of the singer, "He slept with anybody. I don’t think he had to womanize; people just wanted to be with him. Yet he wasn’t sophisticated. If he could f—- it or eat it, it was good for him."

So — the book is not without humour.


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