Robin Williams' daughter Zelda quits Twitter, abandons Instagram after being attacked by online trolls

Actors Robin Williams and his daughter Zelda Williams pose for photographers during the premiere of...

Actors Robin Williams and his daughter Zelda Williams pose for photographers during the premiere of their film "House of D" in New York, in this file picture taken April 10, 2005. REUTERS/Bill Davila

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, Last Updated: 3:33 PM ET


Robin Williams' daughter Zelda is taking a break from social media after she was sent hurtful messages about the death of her father.

The Good Will Hunting actor passed away in an apparent suicide at his home in California on Monday. He was 63.

His 25-year-old daughter Zelda issued a tribute to her father on social media following the news and received an outpouring of love and support, but she has now decided to step away from her accounts to grieve in peace after receiving upsetting messages about Williams' death.

She has also been shaken by a hoax photo circling around Twitter of what online pranksters say is the body of her father.

The photo was actually of a strangulation victim who resembled her father. It had been lifted from a Spanish-language website.

She tweeted, "I'm shaking. I can't. Please. Twitter requires a link and I won't open it. Don't either. Please."

She later deleted the tweet and apologized to followers, stating, "I should've risen above."


She wrote on Instagram.com on Tuesday, "I will be leaving this account for a bit while I heal and decide if I'll be deleting it or not. In this difficult time, please try to be respectful of the accounts of myself, my family and my friends. Mining our accounts for photos of dad, or judging me on the number of them is cruel and unnecessary. There are a couple throughout, but the real private moments I shared with him were precious, quiet, and believe it or not, not full of photos or 'selfies'.


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"I shared him with a world where everyone was taking their photo with him, but I was lucky enough to spend time with him without cameras too. That was more than enough, and I'm grateful for what little time I had. My favorite photos of family are framed in my house, not posted on social media, and they 'll remain there. They would've wound up on the news or blogs then, and they certainly would now. That's not what I want for our memories together. Thank you for your respect and understanding in this difficult time. Goodbye."

 


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