'Trailer Park Boys' breaking cursing record in 'Swearnet'

L to R, John Paul Tremblay, Patrick Roach as Swearman, Mike Smith and Robb Wells of the Trailer...

L to R, John Paul Tremblay, Patrick Roach as Swearman, Mike Smith and Robb Wells of the Trailer Park Boys in Toronto on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014.They are appearing in an upcoming new movie, "Swearnet". Veronica Henri/QMI Agency

Liz Braun, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 1:26 PM ET

Important News!!!  Swearnet, the new movie from the actors who play the Trailer Park Boys, is about to set a world record.

As Mike Smith (Bubbles) explains it, "As soon as Swearnet opens in theatres on Friday we will have the World Record for the most uses of the word 'f—' in a feature. We're taking out Wolf Of Wall Street! They have 506 in a three-hour movie. We have 935 in an hour and a half."

He adds, proudly, "It's very exciting. I never thought we'd have the World Record for anything."

Swearnet stars Smith, 42,  John Paul Tremblay (Julian ), 46,  Robb Wells (Ricky), 43  and most of the other regulars from Trailer Park Boys, including Patrick Roach (Randy), 45, who plays station mascot Swearman.  

In Swearnet, the guys are fed up with TV censorship and start their own Internet network in order to finally say whatever the f— they like.

It's gross-out comedy at its finest.

The following trailer contains coarse language. Viewer discretion is advised.

Smith, Tremblay and Wells — a sort of Holy Trinity of crass hilarity — visited Toronto recently to promote the movie, each sporting a healthy hangover and an official Swearnet anchor blazer. 

The guys talk about declaring an official Swearnet day, the one day each year when  anyone can curse with impunity. (It would be sort of like The Purge, only with filthy language instead of death squads.) 

And on that day, "People can swear at home, at work or at school, " says John Paul Tremblay, helpfully.  Tremblay is the quietest Trailer Park Boy in person, and he among the miscreants seems to have the most traditional family life — which includes three kids aged 10,  11 and two. 

"They know that Daddy swears for a living, and they're cool," he says. 

"They don't swear." 

It's a bit weird being asked for an autograph by their little classmates, he admits. But then, Trailer Park Boys do have a following that includes everybody — male, female, young and old.

On that note: "One of the funniest things that's ever happened to us was coming through the Toronto airport one time, and we hear 'Bubbles! Ricky! Julian!' We turn around," says Smith, "and it's group of seven or eight nuns. In actual habits! The youngest in the group was 76, and they were losing it! They were hugging us and getting pictures and they were so excited!

"We were looking around like we were being Punk'd or on Candid Camera or something."

Meanwhile, the funny thing about Swearnet is that there really is a swearnet.com, and the guys are intent upon getting it up and running for real, just like any other network, except for the blue language. They've even bought a 20,000 square foot building in Halifax, where they all live, for their Swearnet offices.

Says Wells, "We always wanted to start the web site. We were tired of being censored,  and the movie is kind of a way to tell the whole backstory of it and how it came to fruition." 

He continues,  "It's early days now, but we want to eventually have a full running network with news, weather, sports and other shows where everyone can swear."

Those 'other shows' may one day include The Trailer Park Boys;  for now, the all-new season 8 starts September 5 on Netflix. 

As for the rest of Swearnet's offerings, the truth is there's something awesome about news with swearing. Says Wells, "If, during a hurricane, the newscaster said, 'Get out of your f—ing house or you'll f—ing die!' people might listen."

Smith explains that a veteran newsman actually said after Katrina that people might have listened if TV news personnel had been allowed to swear. People in New Orleans have become inured to these weather warnings, he says. 

"If  they'd been allowed to say, 'You have to get out of your f—ing house! This is the real f—ing deal! You're all gonna f—ing die!' people would have listened.  It could have saved some lives.

"And that's what we want to do with Swearnet — save lives through swearing."

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