Canada's Smartest Person: Competition or job fair?

Clip from CBC's new show Canada's Smartest Person. (YouTube/CBC)

Clip from CBC's new show Canada's Smartest Person. (YouTube/CBC)

Bill Harris, QMI Agency

, Last Updated: 1:57 PM ET

When you first hear CBC is seeking Canada’s Smartest Person, it sounds like a job posting to run the CBC.

But despite the challenges facing CBC with regard to government budget cuts and the loss of the NHL contract to Rogers, how you parlay the title of Canada’s Smartest Person into other successes will be up to you.

Canada’s Smartest Person, which aired as a two-hour special in 2012, is returning to CBC this fall as a nine-episode series. It will be taped in front of a live studio audience.

The application process currently is under way, having begun last week and remaining open until June 15. But waiting until the last minute would not be, um, a smart thing to do. Details are available at cbc.ca/smartestperson.

Applicants must be 16 years of age or older as of January 2014. So no annoying whiz-kids, please.

Canada’s Smartest Person is based upon the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, which in recent years has endeavored to redefine what it means to be smart. According to the theory, there are six main categories of intelligence: Logical, visual, physical, linguistic, musical and social. Most people have strength in two or three of these areas, but few excel in all of them.

Which essentially means, you don’t necessarily have to be a rocket scientist. Back in 2012, Peter Dyakowski – an offensive lineman with the CFL’s Hamilton Tiger-Cats, pictured above – emerged with the title of Canada’s Smartest Person.

Dyakowski now has a corner office at CBC. I kid, I kid. But nonetheless, being named Canada’s Smartest Person would be a pretty impressive thing to put on a resume.


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